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8/20/2017 10:48:04 AM

IMG_7897

Andra Mahoney, BS RDH

Why Do I Need to go to the Dentist?

How often should I get a dental checkup?

Dental health varies from person to person, but if you have a healthy mouth, the American Dental Association (ADA) recommends a visit to a Dentist one to two times a year. This enables you to get your teeth cleaned professionally on a regular basis and ensure that any potential problems are identified early.

If you have a history of periodontal disease, then your Hygienist and Dentist will determine the right recall schedule for you.  Based on the measurements of your gums, the Hygienist and Dentist will decide if your mouth’s health best fits a 3 month, 4 month, or 6 month visit.

There is no one-size-fits-all dental treatment. You are a unique individual, with a unique smile and unique needs when it comes to keeping your smile healthy.

Why are regular visits important?

Regular dental visits are important because they can help spot dental health problems early on when treatment is likely to be simpler and more affordable. They also help prevent many problems from developing in the first place. Visiting your dentist regularly is also important because some diseases or medical conditions have symptoms that can appear in the mouth.

I’m not in any pain, do I still have to see a Dentist?

Yes. Even if you don’t have any symptoms, you can still have dental health problems that only a Dentist can diagnose. Regular dental visits will also help prevent problems from developing. Continuity of care is an important part of any health plan, and dental health is no exception. Keeping your mouth healthy is an essential piece of your overall health. It’s also important to keep your Dentist informed of any changes in your overall health since many medical conditions can affect your dental health too.

What do I do if something feels different?

In addition to your regular visit(s) throughout the year, you should schedule an appointment when you notice changes to your dental health, particularly when it involves pain. Chipped teeth, sensitivity to hot or cold, swollen or bleeding gums and persistent tooth pain are all issues to discuss with your Dentist as soon as you notice them. After all, when it comes to dental pain, letting the issue fester often makes the problem worse.

Remember, by seeing your Dentist and Hygienist on a regular basis and following daily good oral hygiene practices at home, you are more likely to keep your teeth and gums healthy.

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Sources:

http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/dental-care-concerns/questions-about-going-to-the-dentist?_ga=2.236638209.1473254089.1503223579-330855655.1503223579

http://www.colgate.com/en/us/oc/oral-health/basics/dental-visits/article/top-10-dental-questions-you-should-ask-1015

http://www.colgate.com/en/us/oc/oral-health/basics/dental-visits/article/how-often-should-you-go-to-the-dentist-as-an-adult-0414

https://oralb.com/en-us/oral-health/life-stages/adults/the-importance-of-regular-dental-visits




8/13/2017 4:35:47 PM

LindsayW

Lindsay Olsen, RDH

WHAT IS LAUGHING GAS?

Nitrous oxide (N2O), commonly referred to as laughing gas, is a safe and effective sedative agent that is mixed with oxygen and inhaled through a small mask that fits over your nose to help you relax. Nitrous oxide is effective as a sedative because it relaxes patients with the pleasurable feelings it emits. Nitrous oxide’s common use in dentistry is due to how quickly it works and that its effects are reversible. For those and other reasons, nitrous oxide is widely considered to be a safe sedation method, even for children!

NITROUS OXIDE FOR CHILDREN

Not only is it safe for children, but laughing gas is a preferred sedation method for children who are nervous or anxious about a pending procedure. Discuss with your child’s dentist ahead of time to determine the appropriate sedation method. Some children may suffer from nausea or have difficulty wearing the mask needed to breathe it in.

Side Effects

The CDA reports that only a minority of patients experience any negative side effects. They can occur if the nitrous level is too high or if the amount being inhaled quickly changes. Potential side effects are as follows:

  • Headaches
  • Shivering
  • Excessive sweating
  • Nausea and/or vomiting
  • Fatigue

Once the nitrous oxide has been turned off, a patient needs to receive oxygen for at least five minutes to avoid a headache. The oxygen removes any remaining gas from the lungs while aiding the patient in becoming alert and awake. As soon and the patient is feeling alert, the dental professional can release the patient to drive oneself home.

Meals are another focus point when receiving nitrous oxide. It’s a good idea to eat lightly prior to your procedure and avoid a big meal for three hours afterward.

Contraindications for Nitrous Oxide

While it’s an effective sedative to ease your dental anxiety, nitrous oxide might not be the right choice for you. Tell your dentist or dental hygienist if you have any of the following conditions: first trimester of pregnancy, COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), a methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency, or a cobalamin deficiency. Additionally, if you are receiving treatment using bleomycin sulfate or have a history of emotional issues or drug addiction, laughing gas may not be recommended.

Talk to your dentist about whether nitrous oxide would be a good option for you.

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Sources:

http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/n/nitrous-oxide

http://www.colgate.com/en/us/oc/oral-health/procedures/anesthesia/article/what-does-laughing-gas-do-0117




8/6/2017 3:00:35 PM

Becky Larson, RDH

What is a crown?

 

Sitting in the dental chair can lead to confusion sometimes.  After all, dental professionals speak in an entirely different language!  Most patients have had a least a few fillings in their life and know what to expect.  However, not everyone has experienced the placement of a dental crown.  So what is a crown?

It’s exactly as it sounds.  A dental crown in similar to a king’s crown that has a rim the whole way around.  Crowns are often referred to as “caps” and are made in the exact shape of the tooth they are covering.  Crowns are restorations used to help improve a tooth’s size, shape, strength, and/or appearance.  When permanently cemented, they cover the entire tooth to the gumline.  

Crowns are indicated for many reasons including:

  • To restore a decayed or broken tooth with less than 50% of tooth structure remaining
  • To replace large fillings
  • To stabilize a tooth that is beginning to fracture
  • To hold a dental bridge
  • Cosmetic reasons including tooth shape and color
  • To cover a dental implant

Crowns are usually placed in two visits.  The first visit consists of preparing the tooth (removing decay and building up the tooth if necessary) and placing a temporary crown.  Permanent crowns are fabricated in a lab and usually take a few weeks for completion.  The second visit consists of placing the permanent crown and taking an xray to ensure proper placement.  

There are several different materials that can be used to make a dental crown including porcelain fused to metal, stainless steel or base metals, ceramic or porcelain, and gold.  Please talk to your dentist to see which material he/she would recommend for you.  

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Sources:

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/dental-crowns#2

http://www.colgate.com/en/us/oc/oral-health/cosmetic-dentistry/bridges-and-crowns/article/different-types-of-dental-crowns-0215




7/25/2017 5:11:54 AM

Lora Cook, RDH

How to Care for Your Infant’s Teeth

When to start cleaning your baby’s teeth

​You can start before your baby even has teeth, it is best to incorporate mouth cleaning at bath time. This routine will help your baby get used to you cleaning their mouth, which can allow a smoother transition when you do begin to brushing their teeth. This will also help you to know when your babies teeth first start to push through their gum tissue.

​The bacteria that lives in the mouth is not harmful to the gum tissue, but can be harmful to the teeth. The enamel on baby teeth are 50% thinner than adult teeth. Therefore baby teeth are more susceptible to the bacteria that causes cavities.

How to clean your infants teeth

​To clean your babies mouth before tooth eruption use a clean wet wash cloth. Wrap wash cloth around your finger then rub it gently around your babies gums.

When to transition to a tooth brush

​When the teeth have started to erupt, this will be time to transition from a wash cloth to a baby tooth brush. Look for a tooth brush specifically made for infants. This will usually start around six months old. This will also be the time to change from bath time mouth cleaning to brushing two times daily.

​It is fine to just dry brush with just tap water, or a fluoridated tooth paste can be used. When using toothpaste, use the tiniest smear. It is never too early to help create a good brushing routine for your child.

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Sources:

http://www.myhealthunit.ca/en/livehealthyandprotectyourhealth/Caring-for-Your-Child-s-Teeth.asp

https://www.mambaby.com/en-us/faq/oral-care-teethers/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI24-c-oih1QIV05d-Ch0rNgnXEAAYAiAAEgL24PD_BwE

 




7/16/2017 4:11:48 PM

Amanda Orvis, RDH

Got Teeth?

It’s that time of year again; our children are starting back to school and getting back into sports. Does your child play sports? Does your child wear an athletic mouthguard? Can you picture your child with a missing permanent tooth? It is very possible that if your child is in a contact sport or activity, that one or more of their teeth could become loose, become fractured, or even be knocked out from a direct impact to their mouth. A hit to the jaw can put a tremendous amount of pressure on our teeth which can cause traumatic damage to our smiles. Maybe we can help answer questions you may have about the pros and cons of athletic mouthguards.

A mouthguard is like a shock absorber, it takes away the brunt of the force upon impact. If you can diffuse the blow and evenly distribute the pressure through use of the mouthguard, then you can reduce the chances of injury and/or tooth loss.

Boil-and-Bite mouthguards can be bought through your local pharmacy or sporting goods store. These mouthguards can be formed to your teeth simply by boiling the plastic and biting down into the mouthguard while it is still warm.

Pros: Affordable, easy to use, and easily replaceable if your teeth are changing in position or shape (due to orthodontics or dental work).

Cons: Bulky, can become loose over time and need to be replaced, hard to speak while wearing it, and hard to disinfect as heat can distort the fit of the mouthguard.

Custom fit mouthguards can be made through your dental office. Dental impressions are taken to form models of your teeth, which are then used to fabricate the mouthguard specifically fit to your teeth.

Pros: Slimmer fit, fits very snuggly around your teeth and does not generally loosen with repeated use, easier to speak with, easily disinfected, and lasts significantly longer than other mouthguards.

Cons: More expensive than a boil-and-bite mouthguard, and they can take some time to receive the mouthguard due to the fabrication process.

There are several types, brands, custom and non-custom mouthguards to choose from, but no matter what type you choose always remember to remind your athlete to wear it. It cannot protect them if it is not being worn. Broken teeth or jaw damage can have lasting effects. Please call our office if you have any questions regarding mouthguards.

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com


Source:

http://www.ada.org/~/media/ADA/Science%20and%20Research/Files/patient_69.ashx




6/26/2017 5:18:24 PM


Cortney Davis, RDH

 

Dry Mouth (Xerostomia)

            Xerostomia is a medical term meaning dry mouth due to the lack of saliva present in your mouth. Individuals that have a dry mouth don’t have enough saliva to keep their mouth moist. Saliva is important because it is a person’s primary defense against tooth decay and helps maintain the health of hard and soft tissue in the mouth. Saliva also is important because it washes away small food particles and debris that would sit on the teeth, has shown to protect against gum disease, helps carry minerals that help rebuild he enamel surfaces of teeth, and can also help neutralize acids in the mouth during and after eating.

What causes dry mouth? Dry mouth is a common side effect of many non-prescription and prescription drugs including drugs to treat anxiety, pain, allergies, colds, depression, etc.. Another common cause of dry mouth is side effects from certain medical treatments. Many people undergoing radiation to the head and neck and chemotherapy have damage to the salivary glands and it reduces the amount of saliva produced. The last common cause of dry mouth is from side effects from infections and diseases including but not limited to Sjorgrens Syndrome, diabetes, HIV/AIDS, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and strokes.

Common symptoms of dry mouth include; frequent thirst, a sticky dry feeling in the mouth, problems speaking, chewing and swallowing, bad breath, and a dry red tongue.

If you have dry mouth make sure you drink plenty of water every day to help stimulate saliva flow, talk to your healthcare provider to find the cause of your dry mouth and what your treatment options are, keep up good dental care by brushing and flossing and going to your dentist for routine check-ups, try over-the-counter saliva substitute’s containing xylitol, and try mouth washes and toothpaste designed for dry mouth such as Biotene.

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Sources:

http://oralhealth.deltadental.com/Adult/GeneralInformation/22,DD205

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/dry-mouth/expert-answers/dry-mouth/faq-20058424

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/dental-health-dry-mouth#1




6/12/2017 6:34:08 PM

Sharma Mulqueen, RDH

How do I know which Toothpaste to pick?

When it comes to choosing toothpaste, sometimes it seems like your options are endless. On the drugstore shelves you’ll see dozens of varieties that claim to whiten your teeth, decrease tooth sensitivity, prevent cavities, heal your gums, protect against tartar—even all of the above! But toothpaste doesn’t just polish teeth; it also removes the bacteria that cause dental plaque and bad breath, so it’s important select a brand that is approved by the American Dental Association. Since everyone has different needs, here are some tips that will help you choose a toothpaste to meet your individual needs.

Types of Toothpaste

  • Anti-cavity: This type of toothpaste contains fluoride. Fluoride not only helps to prevent decay, it also actively strengthens tooth enamel.
  • Anti-gingivitis: If have tender, swollen gums that bleed when you irritate them, this is probably an early sign of gingivitis, a mild form of gum disease. Anti-gingivitis toothpaste helps fight oral bacteria and restore gum health, preventing more serious gum disease.
  • Desensitizing: If your teeth hurt when you consume things like ice cream or cold drinks, this toothpaste can help you. It will provide relief by blocking the tooth’s pain signal to the nerve so that sharp changes in temperature aren’t so painful.
  • Tartar-control: This toothpaste will help control tartar. However, the best way to remove tartar is by scheduling a professional dental cleaning with your Dental Hygienist.
  • Whitening: This toothpaste contains chemicals that are able to help whiten and brighten tooth enamel, thus maintaining the natural color of your teeth. If your teeth are sensitive this is a toothpaste you want to avoid.
  • Children’s: Fluoride or Fluoride free?  When making this decision it is important that you are aware if your child is swallowing the toothpaste.  If they have not learned to spit it out, stick with a non Fluoride toothpaste.  Fluoride is a great benefit for children as it helps remineralize teeth and prevent tooth decay.

It is recommended that everyone brush their teeth twice daily for two minutes and floss daily.  You only need a pea size amount of toothpaste. Today there is toothpaste to meet the oral needs of everyone. But while all of the products on the shelf might seem the same, with a little help from your Dentist or Dental Hygienist, you can determine which is right for you. It is important to schedule dental checkups and professional cleanings twice a year to prevent tooth sensitivity, gum disease, tartar buildup, and tooth decay. We hope to see you soon in one of your dental offices.

Sources:

www.colgate.com

www.ada.com




5/28/2017 3:00:18 PM

KO6A1012-Edit[1]
Ann Clark, RDH
To Floss or Not to Floss?
Since the Feds removed flossing from their dietary guidelines I still get a lot of patients asking if they really need to floss.  The answer is simple:  only the floss the teeth you wish to keep.  How did something so basic and assuredly easy to understand become the subject of debate?  Does anyone really believe that after years of hearing your hygienists request you to floss that we had it wrong?  No.  It is one of the most universal recommendations in all of public health.
So, how has this happened?  Why would the Federal Government remove a guideline so firmly endorsed by the American Dental Association?  The Associated Press reported that the Federal Government removed the recommendation to floss from its dietary guidelines which was first recommended by them in 1979.  Long story short: when asked, they reported that the research supporting its effectiveness didn’t meet their standards.  Any recommendations recommended in its guidelines must, by law, be based on scientific evidence.  They focused on 25 studies over the past decade.  They found the evidence to be “weak/very unreliable”.  The studies sadly used outdated methods or tested too few subjects.  Some lasted only two weeks, too short for a cavity or dental disease to manifest.  One, actually tested people after a single use of floss.  The research focused on warnings signs like bleeding and inflammation, not dealing with gum disease or cavities. Unfortunately there just hasn’t been any great research done on flossing and it’s effects.  There is not only a lack of research done in this area but also it’s actually a difficult subject to produce clear research on for a number of reasons.  So, weak scientific evidence and brief duration of studies has gotten us into this mess.  When the Associated Press failed to get the research to back their recommendations and kept pursuing it…the Feds gave in and removed it from their latest guideline postings.  It’s respectful that they require evidence-based research, and until someone does the work, it just is what it is.
As a dental hygienist of long-standing who sees the difference of a flossed mouth and  a non-flossed mouth on a regular basis, I highly recommend flossing.  Regular flossers can attest to changes in their oral health for the better.  24 hours a day we build a fuzzy film of plaque bacteria in the mouth.   Above the gumline we can clear them with a toothbrush on 3 of the 5 sides of your tooth.  These bacteria also grow below the gumline where the toothbrush can not reach.  Then, let’s say you have deeper pocket depths, places for bacteria to hide?  And what about the 2 sides of the tooth where teeth touch?  How will you get those cleaned?  What small, flexible aide would make sense to use under the tissues to remove that thicker, smelly film?  Unremoved plaque is known to cause redness and inflammation.  Unremoved debris after a period of time lets those conditions fester away eventually eating its way to the bone and subsequently:  causing boneloss…the root of periodontal disease.
The American Dental Association still recommends that you floss.  Regular flossers can attest to changes in their gum health and tooth health.  There are just common sense benefits to flossing.
Questions that I have heard:
     -Can I just use my water pick? ( Or water flosser?) This is another great aide but does not replace floss.  Plain and simple the bacteria on your tooth above the gumline are mechanically disrupted by the motion of the toothbrush.  You need the same between the teeth and below the gumline.  Floss is small enough to go under the gum and extend down the side of the tooth, bend into a “C” shape, stay tight against the tooth structure and physically disrupt the plaque in it’s formation.   Also the very small spot where the 2 sides of your tooth touch together is usually the exact spot where cavities form.  The only way to clean it?? Yes! With floss.   Always floss in conjunction with this great aide.
     -Do I still have to floss?  Lack of strong evidence does not equal lack of effectiveness.
The dept. of Health and Human Services reaffirms the importance of floss in an August 4th statement to the ADA.  “Flossing is an important oral hygiene procedure.  Tooth decay and gum disease can develop when plaque is allowed to build-up on the tooth and along the gumline.  Professional cleaning, tooth brushing and cleaning between the teeth (with aides) have been shown to disrupt and remove plaque.”
Sources:



5/14/2017 3:00:43 PM

IMG_7897

Andra Mahoney BS RDH
Fluoride: It’s Not Just for Kids
 

When someone says fluoride, most of us automatically think children.  While it is true that fluoride is an important part of our children’s oral health, it is also a necessity for adults as well.  Adults, just like children, get cavities. So adults, just like children, should receive fluoride.  In fact, there are many age related problems that increase our need for fluoride.  Some examples include:

  • Eating disorders
  • Drug or Alcohol abuse
  • Lack of regular professional dental care
  • Poor Oral Hygiene
  • Exposed root surfaces of teeth, recession
  • Decreased salivary flow, resulting in dry mouth
  • Poor diet
  • Existing fillings
  • Tooth enamel defects
  • Undergoing head and neck radiation therapy

I’d like to address recession and dry mouth specifically, since those are very common problems.

 

Recession

Recession is when the gums have receded below the crown of the tooth, exposing the root to the tooth.

This creates two main problems. First, the roots of the teeth do not have enamel, they are covered by cementum.

As we all know, enamel is the hard material that protects the surface of the tooth. Enamel is 70 times stronger than cementum.  This, unfortunately, means that the roots of the teeth are more prone to decay than the crowns of the teeth.  The best recommendation for recession and the prevention of decay is fluoride.  Make sure you are using a soft bristled brush with soft brushing (to prevent further recession) in combination with fluoride toothpaste.  Also, you may received fluoride treatments at your dental appointments.  The most beneficial would be fluoride varnish.  Your hygienist is able to apply this for you at each appointment.  The varnish coats the tooth in a protective layer of fluoride to aid in the prevention of decay.

The second problem that recession creates is sensitivity.  When the root is exposed tiny little tubules open up on the tooth and the chances for sensitivity increase.  This makes eating or drinking cold or sweet things painful.  You will often notice a sharp zing when the area of recession comes in contact with cold or sweet items.  The best recommendation for sensitivity due to recession is fluoride.  Sensitivity toothpaste, such as Sensodyne, contain an increased amount of fluoride (as opposed to regular toothpaste) to assist in the prevention of sensitivity (and decay).

Fluoride varnish is also helpful as it coats the tooth and temporarily closes the tubules decreasing the sensitivity. 

Xerostomia

The last topic that I wanted to address is dry mouth, also known as xerostomia.  Many adults take medicine and the most common side effect of many medications is dry mouth.  A decrease in saliva increases your risk for decay.  Saliva is important in washing away bits of food, neutralizing acids created by bacteria, as well as containing minerals that help prevent tooth decay.  If you are having problems with dry mouth, try rinsing with a fluoride mouth was or a saliva substitute.
    

All these reasons and many more show the importance of fluoride use for adults.  If you have any other questions about the other problems that fluoride can help with, feel free to make an appointment with us and we’ll answer all your questions! 

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Sources:

Fluoride Treatments in the Dental Office ADA: http://www.ada.org/sections/scienceAndResearch/pdfs/patient_72.pdf

Can Fluoride Help Adults? Colgate: http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/Oral-and-Dental-Health-at-Any-Age/Adults/Adult-Maintenance-and-Care/article/Can-Fluoride-Help-Adults.cvsp

Recommendations for Using Fluoride to Prevent and Control Dental Caries in the United States CDC: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5014a1.htm




5/7/2017 7:18:23 PM

KatieM

Katie Sias, BS RDH

Adverse Effects of Not Replacing Missing Teeth

According to the American College of Prosthodontists, more than 35 million Americans do not have any teeth, and 178 million people in the United States are missing at least one tooth. Tooth loss occurs due to a number of issues such as decay, gum disease, injury, cancer, or wear. Your teeth are designed to work together to help you chew, speak, and smile. There are several tooth replacement options your Dentist may suggest depending on your needs such as implants, bridges, or dentures. However, do you know the risks of not replacing those missing teeth?

Bone Loss:

When a tooth is extracted or missing, bone loss can occur. The jawbone is preserved through the pressure and stimulation of chewing. When a tooth is missing, the bone resorbs and results in less density and width/height of the bone. Unfortunately, if left untreated for a long amount of time, the bone can start deteriorating around the adjacent teeth as well.

Shifting Teeth:

When a tooth is missing, the opposing tooth that is still there can often shift and super-erupt because it does not have a tooth to occlude with. Adjacent teeth can start drifting forward in the place of the missing teeth. These can cause a change in bite that will eventually affect your chewing and lead to more serious side effects.

TMJ Problems:

When your teeth shift out of alignment and your upper and lower jaws do not meet properly, it strains and damages the jaw joint. Muscle soreness may occur as you will tend to favor the other side of your mouth for chewing.

Periodontal Disease:

Missing teeth increase the risk of periodontal disease. When teeth shift out of alignment, it makes it harder to properly brush and floss those teeth.

Esthetics:

Missing teeth can affect the esthetics of your face. Many people feel less confident about their smile when they have gaps from missing teeth. If you are missing many teeth, the skin around your mouth loses support and will start to droop, which can make you appear older than you are.

Speak and Eat:

Missing teeth can alter the way you speak and eat. Depending on which teeth are missing, it may become difficult to bite and chew certain foods. Often times, you will most likely being overusing the other teeth to compensate for the missing tooth or teeth. You may develop a lisp or change in your ability to clearly pronounce certain works.

Most patients are unaware of the adverse effects of not replacing their missing teeth. Now that you know some of these risks, please consult your Dentist for the best replacement option for you!

Want to learn more? Visit us at

http://www.shalimarfamilydentistry.com

http://www.northstapleydentalcare.com

http://www.alamedadentalaz.com

http://www.dentistingilbert.com

Sources:

https://www.gotoapro.org/facts-figures/

http://crowncouncil.com/why-replace-lost-teeth

https://www.perio.org/node/222

https://www.nobelbiocare.com/content/patient/international/en/home/missing-teeth/why-is-it-important-to-replace-missing-teeth-.html




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